Erfðanefnd landbúnaðarinsPlants for human consumption
Senda fyrirspurn
Minnka letur
Stækka letur
In English

Tenglar

LANDSÁÆTLUN 2014-2018

ERFDALINDASETUR LBHÍ

 

STEFNUMÖRKUNARÁÆTLUN

ERFÐANEFNDAR 2009-2013

 

MÁLÞING ERFÐANEFNDAR OKT 2010

 

NordGen

 

GLOBALDIV

 

ELBARN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plants for human consumption

Wild plants

A number of wild plants exist in Iceland that have been, or can be, used for human consumptions, whether as food, spices or medicine.

The most common ones are:

This list is not exhaustive and among species not mentioned are: Caraway, sweat cicely, chive and lovage. In addition, wild plants exist that have mainly been used for colouring fabrics.

Non-wild plants

Growing plants (other than wild species) for human consumption became common in Iceland around 1800. Some species have lost their role as a part of local diets but most still exist as such. The most common ones are:

Value

The Nordic Genetic Resource Centre, NordGen, now stores populations of Icelandic rutabaga. The Agricultural University of Iceland is responsible for preserving Icelandic potato populations.

Most species of wild plants used by humans are common around Iceland and, therefore, best kept in their natural habitats. The field garlic is an exception being classified in danger of becoming extinct.

Byggir á LiSA - Eskill, Sharepoint, Veflausnir og Vefumsjónarkerfi


Leit

Leitarvél